New Jersey Schools to Teach First and Second Graders About “Gender Identity” and “Climate Change” in Fall

A new curriculum in New Jersey’s public schools will include lessons related to gender identity and climate change this fall.

Starting this fall, first and second graders in New Jersey’s public schools will be taught about gender identity and climate change according to the curriculum provided to parents in the Westfield school district.

New Jersey parents outraged at plan for first-graders to be given sex education lessons dubbed ‘Pink, Blue and Purple’ on gender identity while second-graders will learn you can ‘have boy parts but feel like a girl’

  • New sex education guidelines were handed out to New Jersey parents at a meeting in February
  • A 30-minute lesson called ‘Pink, Blue and Purple’ teaches the students to define ‘gender, gender identity and gender role stereotypes’
  • The curriculum also includes instructions for teachers to tell students that their gender identity is up to them
  • Part of the lesson plan states, ‘You might feel like you’re a boy even if you have body parts that some people might tell you are ”girl” parts’
  • The materials were reportedly distributed to parents at a Feb. 22 meeting of the Westfield Board of Education
  • Former Gov. Chris Christie, and other Republican officials, slammed New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy for New Jersey schools planning to teach gender identity to children
  • The new state sex education guidelines go into effect in September

First-graders in New Jersey will be learning about gender identity with new sex education curriculum which includes a lesson that teaches children they can have ‘boy parts’ but ‘feel like’ a girl.

The new lessons, which are part of a broader, K-12 health and sex education curriculum adopted by the New Jersey Board of Education, are alarming some parents, Asbury Park Press first reported.

One of the 30-minute lesson plans, called ‘Pink, Blue and Purple,’ teaches the students to define ‘gender, gender identity and gender role stereotypes.’

Another lesson plan, this one for second-graders called ‘Understanding Our Bodies,’ tells teachers to instruct students that ‘being a boy or a girl doesn’t have to mean you have those parts, there are some body parts that mostly just girls have and some parts that mostly just boys have.’

‘Most people have a vulva and a vagina or a penis and testicles, but some people’s bodies can be different,’ the plan states. ‘Your body is exactly what is right for you.’ 

The new state sex education guidelines, which go into effect in September, were handed out to parents at the Westfield Board of Education meeting in February, and included instructions for teachers to tell students that their gender identity is up to them.

‘You might feel like you’re a boy even if you have body parts that some people might tell you are ”girl” parts,’ the lesson plan states.

‘You might feel like you’re a girl even if you have body parts that some people might tell you are ”boy” parts. And you might not feel like you’re a boy or a girl, but you’re a little bit of both. No matter how you feel, you’re perfectly normal!’ 

Many New Jersey parents are outraged over the new lesson plans, with some weighing the decision to remove their child from the public school system. 

Dailymail.com has reached out to the Board of Education for comment.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-10702691/First-graders-New-Jersey-given-sex-education-lessons-dubbed-Pink-Blue-Purple.html#i-3e72b838d845743b
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-10702691/First-graders-New-Jersey-given-sex-education-lessons-dubbed-Pink-Blue-Purple.html#i-5ce121a175521644

New lesson plans in NJ instruct teachers to tell students their gender identity is up to them and that ‘being a boy or a girl doesn’t have to mean you have those parts’

Pink, Blue and Purple By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:1. Define gender, gender identity and gender role stereotypes. 2. Name at least two things they’ve been taught about gender role stereotypes, and how those things may limit people of all genders.Sample lesson: Tell students they are to decide whether what’s in the picture is something that only boys should play with, only girls should play with or that anyone can play with. Discussion Sometimes, when a boy does something that’s not on the ‘boy’ list, or when a girl does something that’s not on the ‘girl’ list, they’ll get teased or even bullied. For example, a boy who cries in front of his friends or likes to play dress up, or a girl who likes to climb or play with rockets.Explain that it is never okay to tease or bully someone else and it’s never okay for someone to tease or bully you.Understanding Our Bodies By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:1. Correctly identify at least four body parts of the female genitals. 2. Correctly identify at least four body parts of the male genitals. 3. Describe why it is important for them to know the correct names for the genitals. This lesson refers to ‘girls’ and ‘boys’ when identifying body parts. The use of a binary construct of gender as well as using gender (boys and girls) rather than the more accurate biological sex (male and female) is purposeful given the developmental stage of students.This lesson does, however, acknowledge that there are some body parts that mostly just girls have and some parts that mostly just boys have. Being a boy or a girl doesn’t have to mean you have those parts, but for most people this is how their bodies are. And, ‘Most people have a vulva and a vagina or a penis and testicles but some people’s bodies can be different. Your body is exactly what is right for you.’Tell students: ‘There are some body parts that mostly just girls have and some parts that mostly just boys have.’ ‘These body parts, which are usually covered by clothing or a bathing suit, are sometimes called private parts or genitals and today we want to make sure everyone knows the correct names for these parts and who has what body part.’ Display male body and female body on PowerPoint slides to go over which body parts are different and which ones are the same. Have the class label body parts on male and on female. By asking the class which body parts only girls have, only boys have and both have, the teacher can assess the knowledge of the class.An alternative assessment strategy is for the teacher to ask, ‘Who has a vulva? Girls, boys or both? Who has a penis?’ etc. and have the class respond. By asking students why it might be important to know the correct names for these body parts, the teacher can gauge student understanding by their responses.Source: Lesson plans from Rights, Respect, Responsibility: A K-12 Curriculum

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